Scroll Top

Advocacy

Advocacy

In connection with Safe Kids Week, which, this year, is focused on child passenger safety, CPSAC has partnered with Parachute and Child Safety Link to recommend improvements to child passenger safety legislation in each province and territory. Around Safe Kids Week, running from May 29th to June 4th, Parachute will be sending letters to provincial/territorial ministers across the country with our recommendations. 

We – Parachute and CPSAC – encourage CPSTs to join the effort by calling for change from your provincial/territorial and municipal government representatives. Below is a template email that you can send to your local ministers and MPPs. We welcome you to customize the email if you wish, to speak to your experience as a CPST. We have provided a table below listing the specific email addresses for the appropriate ministers in each jurisdiction, as well as links to find your local MPP. 

Please send your emails between June and December 2023. This will allow your email to reach government between two child passenger safety-focused campaigns: Safe Kids Week (May 29-June 4) and Child Passenger Safety Week (September 16-24). 

 

How to participate:

Step 1: Find the contact information for the appropriate members of government for your area (see below, sorted by province/territory).

Step 2: Copy and paste the text of the email template (below) into an email. Don’t forget to edit the introduction, who it’s from at the end, and add any personal perspective or anecdotes you want to include. Look for sections in [square brackets] that are placeholders for these edits.

Step 3: Include the legislation summary in your email.

Step 4: Send your email!

Défense des droits

Dans le cadre de la Semaine SécuriJeunes qui, cette année, est axée sur la sécurité des enfants passagers, l’ASEPC s’est associée à Parachute et à Child Safety Link pour recommander des améliorations à la législation sur la sécurité des enfants passagers dans chaque province et territoire. Pendant la semaine SécuriJeunes, qui se déroule du 29 mai au 4 juin, Parachute enverra des lettres aux ministres provinciaux et territoriaux de tout le pays pour leur faire part de nos recommandations.

Nous – Parachute et l’ASEPC – encourageons les TSEP à se joindre à l’effort en demandant des changements à leurs représentants provinciaux/territoriaux et municipaux. Vous trouverez ci-dessous un modèle de courriel que vous pouvez envoyer à vos ministres et députés locaux. Nous vous invitons à personnaliser ce courriel si vous le souhaitez, afin de parler de votre expérience en tant que TSEP. Vous trouverez ci-dessous un tableau indiquant les adresses électroniques des ministres concernés dans chaque juridiction, ainsi que des liens pour trouver votre député local.

Veuillez envoyer vos courriels entre juin et decembre 2023. Cela permettra à votre courriel de parvenir au gouvernement entre deux campagnes axées sur la sécurité des enfants passagers : La Semaine SécuriJeunes (29 mai-4 juin) et la Semaine de la sécurité des enfants passagers (16-24 septembre).

Comment participer :

Étape 1 : Trouvez les coordonnées des membres du gouvernement de votre région (voir ci-dessous, classées par province/territoire).

Étape 2 : Copiez et collez le texte du modèle (ci-dessous) dans un courriel. N’oubliez pas de modifier l’introduction, de préciser de qui il s’agit et d’ajouter toute perspective personnelle ou anecdote que vous souhaitez inclure. Les sections entre [crochets] sont des espaces réservés pour ces modifications.

Étape 3 : Incluez le résumé dans votre courrier électronique.

Étape 4 : Envoyez votre courrier électronique !

Email to Ministers – Template

Make sure to replace sections in [brackets] with information specific to your email. Make sure to include the legislation summary in your email.

Subject line:

Improving child passenger safety legislation

Dear Minister [insert Minister’s last name],

I am writing in support of recommendations regarding child passenger safety legislation put forth by Parachute, Canada’s leading injury prevention organization.

Car crashes are a leading cause of death and injury to children in Canada. Children are well protected and less likely to be severely injured when the right child passenger seat, booster seat or seat belt is used on every ride. A Canadian roadside study found that 99 per cent of kids were buckled but 65 per cent of all rear-facing seats and 79 per cent of all forward-facing seats were installed incorrectly, 30 per cent of children in booster seats did not meet the legal weight minimum and 52 per cent of children in seat belts did not fit safely without a booster seat. All of which means that in the event of a collision, a concerning proportion of child passengers are at increased risk of injury or death. Using the right car seat in the right way can reduce the risk of injury by up to 82 per cent and risk of death by up to 71 per cent. When installed and used correctly, car seats save lives.

Since the development of provincial and territorial child passenger safety legislation, car seat manufacturers’ weight and height limits have changed to better support child passenger safety best practice. In order to bring regulations up to date, Parachute, in partnership with the Child Passenger Safety Association of Canada and Child Safety Link, have developed key child passenger safety legislation recommendations (please see the summary below). Policy change, to complement developments in car seat and vehicle design, supported by enforcement and education, will form an effective multi-faceted approach to keeping kids and families safer on the road. 

Taking a broad view of the issue, Parachute partnered with a diverse group of stakeholders including representatives from Child Safety Link, the Child Passenger Safety Association of Canada, the Canadian Collaborating Centres for Injury Prevention, the Trauma Association of Canada Injury Prevention Committee, the Canadian Paediatric Society, the Ontario Provincial Police and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Across this group, there was widespread agreement as to the recommended evidence-based and expert-informed improvements that should be made to child passenger safety legislation. I see it as extremely promising for the future of child passenger injury in Canada that there is this degree of consensus across sectors on the best way forward to reduce the magnitude of this issue.

 

[If you would like to speak to your experience, add it here]

 

As a Child Passenger Safety Technician certified through the Child Passenger Safety Association of Canada, I support the child passenger safety legislation recommendations put forward by Parachute. I implore that you take these recommendations under consideration. The issue of child passenger injury in Canada is a serious one. The fact is, most of these injuries are preventable. To address this issue, it is imperative to take the actionable steps that Parachute has presented to improve child passenger safety legislation. With these recommended improvements to policy, families can go about their daily lives without undue risk to the children’s health and well-being. 

Sincerely,

[Insert name]
[City, Province/Territory]
Child Passenger Safety Technician (CPST)
Child Passenger Safety Association of Canada

Parachute’s Recommendation

Rear-facing car seat*: Require infants and young children to be securely buckled rear facing until they are at least two years old AND 10 kg (22 lb). 

Car seat*: Require young children (older than two years old AND at least 10 kg (22 lb)) to be securely buckled in a car seat with a five-point harness until they are at least five years old AND 18 kg (40 lb).

Booster seat*: Require all children that are at least five years old AND weigh at least 18 kg (40 lb) to be securely buckled in a car seat with a five-point harness or belt positioning booster seat until they are at least 145 cm (4’9) tall OR 12 years of age. 

Seat belt : Require that a child must be at least 12 years of age OR 145 cm (4’9) tall to ride with a seat belt alone. Extend legislation to mandate the use of both a lap and shoulder belt where available.

Taxi and ride-share vehicles : Remove all exemptions for passenger vehicles, including taxis and ride-share vehicles, regarding child restraint laws and seat belt laws. For an example of legislation that accomplishes this recommendation, please see Newfoundland and Labrador’s Highway Traffic Act, RSNL 1990, c. H-3, s. 178.1.  

Special transportation needs : Include the use of seats certified to CMVSS 213.3 and 213.5 to support the legal transportation of infants, children and youth with special health care needs. Include a clear provision for the use of adaptive seats certified in other jurisdictions (e.g., the United States) if an infant, child or youth’s medical, physical or behavioural needs cannot be met by a seat certified under CMVSS. For an example of legislation that accomplishes this recommendation, please see Quebec’s Highway Safety Code, CQLR 1986, c. C-24.2, s. 397 – s. 400.  

*Provisions or exemptions should be made for children who exceed height or weight limits of car seats or booster seats approved for use in Canada, but who do not yet meet the age minimum to move to the next stage of seat according to the revised law.

Courriel aux ministres – modèle

Veillez à remplacer les sections entre [crochets] par des informations spécifiques à votre courriel. Veillez à inclure le résumé de la législation dans votre courriel.

Objet :

Améliorer la législation sur la sécurité des enfants passagers

Chère Ministre [insérez le nom de famille du Ministre],

Je vous écris pour appuyer les recommandations concernant la législation sur la sécurité des enfants passagers présentées par Parachute, le principal organisme de prévention des blessures au Canada.

Les collisions de voiture sont l’une des principales causes de décès et de blessures chez les enfants au Canada. Les enfants sont bien protégés et moins susceptibles d’être gravement blessés lorsque le bon siège d’auto, le bon siège d’appoint ou la bonne ceinture de sécurité sont utilisés à chaque trajet. Une étude canadienne a révélé que 99 % des enfants étaient attachés, mais que 65 % de tous les sièges orientés vers l’arrière et 79 % de tous les sièges orientés vers l’avant étaient mal installés. De plus, 30 % des enfants dans les sièges d’appoint ne respectaient pas le poids minimum légal et 52 % des enfants portant la ceinture de sécurité n’étaient pas correctement attachés sans un siège d’appoint. Ce qui signifie qu’en cas de collision, une proportion inquiétante des enfants passagers sont plus exposés aux risques de blessures ou de décès. 

Depuis l’élaboration de la législation provinciale et territoriale sur la sécurité des enfants passagers, les limites de poids et de taille des fabricants de sièges d’auto ont été modifiées pour mieux soutenir les meilleures pratiques de sécurité des enfants passagers. Afin de mettre à jour les règlements, Parachute, en partenariat avec l’Association pour la sécurité des enfants passagers du Canada (ASEPC) et Child Safety Link, a élaboré des recommandations clés pour la législation sur la sécurité des enfants passagers (veuillez consulter le résumé ci-dessous). Un changement de politique, pour compléter les développements en matière de conception de sièges d’auto et de véhicules, soutenu par l’application de la loi et l’éducation, constituera une approche multifacette efficace pour rendre les enfants et les familles plus en sécurité sur la route.

En adoptant une perspective globale de la question, Parachute a collaboré avec un groupe diversifié de parties prenantes, incluant des représentants de Child Safety Link, l’Association pour la sécurité des enfants passagers du Canada, des Centres de collaboration canadiens pour la prévention des blessures, du Comité de prévention des blessures de l’Association canadienne de traumatologie, de la Société canadienne de pédiatrie, de la Police provinciale de l’Ontario et de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada. Parmi ce groupe, un consensus important s’est formé autour des améliorations basées sur des preuves et éclairées par des experts qui devraient être intégrées dans la législation relative à la sécurité des enfants passagers. Je pense qu’il est extrêmement prometteur pour l’avenir des blessures des enfants passagers au Canada, compte tenu de ce degré de consensus dans différents secteurs sur la meilleure façon de réduire l’ampleur de ce problème. 

 

[Si vous souhaitez parler de votre expérience, ajoutez-la ici]

 

En tant que Technicien en sécurité des enfants passagers certifié par l’Association pour la sécurité des enfants passagers du Canada, j’appuie les recommandations législatives sur la sécurité des enfants passagers proposées par Parachute. Je vous prie de prendre ces recommandations en considération. La question des blessures des enfants passagers au Canada est sérieuse. Le fait est que – la plupart de ces blessures sont tout à fait évitables. Pour résoudre ce problème, il est crucial de mettre en œuvre les mesures tangibles que Parachute a proposées  pour améliorer la législation sur la sécurité des enfants passagers. Avec les améliorations que nous recommandons à la politique, les familles peuvent vaquer à leurs occupations quotidiennes sans risque excessif pour la santé et le bien-être des enfants.

Vous remerciant,

[Votre nom]
[Ville, Province]
Technicien en sécurité des enfants passagers (TSEP)
Association pour la sécurité des enfants passagers du Canada

Recommandations de Parachute

Siège auto orienté vers l’arrière* : Nous recommandons d’exiger que tous les enfants soient attachés de manière sécurisée dans un véhicule de tourisme, dans un siège auto orienté vers l’arrière jusqu’à ce qu’ils aient au moins deux ans ET qu’ils pèsent 10 kg (22 lb).

Siège auto orienté vers l’avant* : Nous recommandons d’exiger que tous les enfants qui ont au moins deux ans ET qu’ils pèsent au moins 10 kg (22 lb) soient attachés de manière sécurisée dans un véhicule de tourisme, dans un siège auto avec un harnais à cinq points jusqu’à ce qu’ils pèsent au moins cinq ans ET pèsent 18 kg (40 lb). 

Siège d’appoint* : Nous recommandons d’exiger que tous les enfants soient attachés de manière sécurisée dans un véhicule de tourisme, dans un siège auto avec un harnais à cinq points ou un siège d’appoint positionné par une ceinture jusqu’à ce qu’ils aient au moins 12 ans OU qu’ils mesurent 145 cm (4’9).

Ceinture de sécurité : Nous recommandons d’exiger qu’un enfant doit avoir au moins 12 ans OU qu’ils mesurer 145 cm (4’9) pour voyager dans un véhicule de tourisme avec une ceinture de sécurité seule. Étendre la législation pour rendre obligatoire l’utilisation d’une ceinture abdominale et d’une ceinture diagonale lorsqu’elles sont disponibles.

Taxis et véhicules de covoiturage : Nous recommandons de supprimer toutes les exemptions pour les véhicules de tourisme, y compris les taxis et les véhicules de covoiturage, concernant les lois sur les retenues pour enfants et les ceintures de sécurité. Pour un exemple de législation qui répond à cette recommandation, veuillez consulter le Code de la route de Terre-Neuve et du Labrador, RSNL 1990, c. H-3, art. 178.1.

Besoins de transport spéciaux : Nous recommandons d’inclure dans législation l’utilisation de sièges certifiés selon NSVAC 213.3 et 213.5 pour soutenir le transport légal des nourrissons, des enfants et des jeunes ayant des besoins de soins de santé spéciaux. Nous recommandons d’inclure une disposition claire pour l’utilisation de sièges adaptatifs certifiés dans d’autres juridictions (par exemple, les États-Unis) si les besoins médicaux, physiques ou comportementaux d’un nourrisson, d’un enfant ou d’un jeune ne peuvent pas être satisfaits par un siège certifié selon NSVAC. Nous citons le Code de la sécurité routière du Québec, CQLR 1986, c. C-24.2, s. 397 – s. 400 comme un exemple pour les autres juridictions de la législation qui répond à cette recommandation.

*Des dispositions ou des exemptions devraient être prévues pour les enfants qui dépassent les limites de taille ou de poids des sièges d’auto ou des sièges d’appoint approuvés pour utilisation au Canada, mais qui n’ont pas encore atteint l’âge minimum pour passer à l’étape suivante du siège selon la loi révisée.

Contacts by province/territory / Contacts par province/territoire

Honourable Rob Fleming, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure, [email protected] 

Honourable Adrian Dix, Minister of Health, [email protected] 

Honourable Mitzi Dean, Minister of Children and Family Development, [email protected] 

Amy Miller, Assistant Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Motor Vehicles, [email protected]

Find your local MLA here.

Honourable Devin Dreeshen, Minister of Transportation and Economic Corridors, [email protected] 

Honourable Adriana LaGrange, Minister of Health, [email protected]

Find your local MLA here.

Honourable Lisa Naylor, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure, [email protected] 

Honourable Uzoma Asagwara, Minister of Health, Seniors and Longterm Care, [email protected]

Honourable Scott Sinclair, Deputy Minister of Health, Seniors and Longterm Care,  [email protected]

Honourable Nahanni Fontaine, Minister of Families, [email protected]

Honourable Matt Wiebe, Minister of Justice, [email protected]

Find your local MLA here.

Honourable Diane Archie, Minister of Infrastructure, [email protected] 

Honourable Julie Green, Minister of Health, [email protected]

Find your local MLA here.

Honourable Jeff Carr, Minister of Transportation, [email protected]

Honourable Bruce Fitch, Minister of Health, [email protected]

Find your local MLA here.

Honourable Elvis Loveless, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure, [email protected] 

Honourable Tom Osborne, Minister of Health and Community Services, [email protected]

Honourable Dr. John Haggie, Minister of Education, [email protected]

Find your local MHA here.

Honourable Kim Masland, Minister of Public Works, [email protected] 

Honourable Michelle Thompson, Minister of Health, [email protected] 

Honourable Karla MacFarlane, Minister of Community Services, [email protected]

Find your local MLA here.

Honourable David Akeeagok, Minister of Economic Development and Transportation, [email protected] 

Honourable John Main, Minister of Health, [email protected]

Find your local MLA here.

Honourable Caroline Mulroney, Minister of Transportation, [email protected] 

Honourable Sylvia Jones, Minister of Health, [email protected]

Find your local MPP here.

Honourable Ernie Hudson, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure, [email protected] 

Honourable Mark McLane, Minister of Health and Wellness, [email protected]

Bloyce Thompson, Minister of Justice and Public Safety, [email protected]

cc:
Jonah Clements, Deputy Minister of Justice and Public Safety, [email protected]

Find your local MLA here.

L’honorable Geneviève Guilbault, Ministre des Transports et de la Mobilité durable, [email protected] 

L’honorable Christian Dubé, Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, [email protected]

Trouvez votre représentant local ici.

Honourable Jeremy Cockril, Minister of Highways, [email protected] 

Honourable Paul Merriman, Minister [email protected]

Find your local MLA here. 

Honourable Nils Clarke, Minister of Highways and Public Works, [email protected]

Find your local MLA here.